Never Before Seen Photographs and Contact Sheets from Andy Warhol

A fantastic collection of the late, great Andy Warhol’s photography is currently on display at Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center. To this day, Warhol continues to be politically and socially relevant and Contact Warhol: Photography Without End promises to reintroduce us to his unbelievable talent.

L.3.5.2018
Andy Warhol (U.S.A., 1928–1987), Liza Minnelli, 1977. Polaroid™ Polacolor Type 108. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Photographs by Andy Warhol that have never before been displayed publicly are at the heart of the exhibition, Contact Warhol: Photography Without End, which draws on a trove of over 130,000 photographic exposures that the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University acquired from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts in 2014.

The collection of 3,600 contact sheets and corresponding negatives represents the complete range of Warhol’s black-and-white photographic practice from 1976 until his unexpected death in1987.

L.3.1.2.2018Andy Warhol (U.S.A., 1928–1987), Liza Minnelli, 1979. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution Dia Center for the Arts. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol Museum permission received 6/1/18 ARS copyright permission pending

The exhibition brings to life Warhol’s many interactions with the social and celebrity elite of his time with portraits of stars such as Michael Jackson, Liza Minnelli, and Dolly Parton; younger sensations in the art world such as Keith Haring and Jean Michel Basquiat; and political stars, including Nancy Reagan, Maria Shriver, and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

The focus of the exhibition, Warhol’s photographic contact sheets, represents a visual analogue to the artist’s diaries, which were tape-recorded phone conversations. “Whether commenting on sex, money, physical appearance, or social standing, the artist sized up his friends and acquaintances, as well as himself, with merciless precision,” curator Richard Meyer said.

The catalogue accompanying the exhibition is published by the Cantor in association with MIT Press. In addition to essays by the curators, the volume includes three other scholarly essays and 65 plates.

L.3.56.2018Andy Warhol (U.S.A., 1928–1987), Jean-Michel Basquiat, ca. 1982. Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and urine on canvas. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

This exhibition could not be more relevant, the curators noted, because Warhol’s daily photographic practice for the last eleven years of his life anticipates current daily photographic habits across social media platforms like Instagram and Snapchat, where the “Warhol effect” remains central to contemporary art, culture, and everyday life.

The exhibition will run until 6 January 2019.

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